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Find a Business Near: Alabama

Choose A City In Alabama

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Below is a list of all cities within the State of Alabama in which we have business listings.
 

Population for Alabama: 4,777,326

Total Males: 2,317,520
Total Females: 2,459,806
Median Household Income: $43,160
Total Households: 1,837,576

A List of Cities is Below

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Number of Firms, Establishments, Employment, and Payroll by Employee Size for Alabama (2015)

STATE EMPLOYMENT SIZE FIRMS ESTABLISHMENTS EMPLOYMENT ANNUAL PAYROLL (1,000)
Alabama 01: Total 73,409 98,540 1,634,391 $67,370,353
Alabama 02: 0-4 39,724 39,799 71,722 $2,590,485
Alabama 03: 5-9 13,646 13,804 89,771 $2,941,589
Alabama 04: 10-19 8,205 8,578 109,487 $3,818,925
Alabama 05: <20 61,575 62,181 270,980 $9,350,999
Alabama 06: 20-99 7,358 10,103 272,084 $10,394,604
Alabama 07: 100-499 1,981 5,266 232,765 $9,405,233
Alabama 08: <500 70,914 77,550 775,829 $29,150,836
Alabama 09: 500+ 2,495 20,990 858,562 $38,219,517

Green Initiatives & Environmental History for: Alabama





Basic History

At the close of the American Revolution, Great Britain formally surrendered all lands east of the Mississippi to the United States. The territory of Mississippi included parts of the present-day Alabama, but the land was largely a wilderness with a considerable fur trade and beginnings of cotton cultivation. However, both the fur trade and cotton production had to be interrupted during a war in 1812 when new settlers poured into the Alabama region from Georgia and Tennessee. The wealthy newcomers settled in the fertile bottomlands, established large plantations and produced cotton. The poorer ones took over the less fertile uplands, where they eked out a living. The population eventually grew to such an extent that the Territory of Alabama was set up in 1817, and two years later in 1819, it officially became a state.

Environmental History

Alabama was once covered by vast forests of pine, which still form the largest proportion of the state’s forest growth. Alabama has an abundance of cypress, hickory, oak, and various gum trees. Red cedar grows throughout the state. There are more than 150 shrubs, and cultivated plants include wisteria and camellia. In a state where large herds of bison, elk, bear and deer once roamed, only the white-tailed deer remains abundant. Ninety-seven animals, fish and birds (including the Alabama beach mouse, gray bat, red-belly turtle, bald eagle, finback and humpback whales, and wood stork), and eighteen plant species are now listed endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Green Initiatives

The ‘Go-Green Initiatives’ of the Going Green Project, GreenSense LLC, etc, highlight some of the important developments toward making Alabama a greener place to live, work and play. The environmental legislation and policies include: stricter standards for more than 50 cancer-causing pollutants; landfill fee and recycling initiative; tougher fines for illegal hunting and fishing; habitat and species protection; nature conservation; ensuring greener cities and green buildings in terms of renewable energy, public transit, recycling and setting aside land for parks and nature preserves; reduced waste and water consumption; media, business and festivals regularly scheduling ‘green’ features; expansion in the use of renewable and alternative energy sources; ‘clean fuel’ movement like use of biofuels/biodiesel; Statewide water plan resolution and provision of water conservation kits to Alabama residents which include leak-detection tablets, toilet-displacement bags to reduce water usage, lawn watering gauge, etc; expanding urban parkland and open spaces; use of innovative and creative techniques to revitalize blighted, contaminated lands for productive, new uses.


Recent News:








YPGG: Opting Out of Phone Book Delivery Vital for Consumers and Environment
Lee Ann Rush   Companies which print paper books are burning 3.2 kilowatts of electricity per hour and wasting over 7,200,000 barrels of fossil fuel. NORTHPORT — YellowPagesGoesGreen.org (“YPGG“), a telephone directory at the forefront of the environmentally-conscious “Green” movement, is announcing the greater-than-ever need to participate in the national “out-out” movement regarding unwanted home delivery...

Yellow Pages Goes Green: 2018 Will Herald End of Print Phone Directories in F...
Administrator   WANTAGH, N.Y. –   YellowPagesGoesGreen.org (“YPGG“), a telephone directory at the forefront of the environmentally-conscious “Green” movement, has made a bold proclamation- that 2018 will be the year that digital and web-based business and residential directory distribution will take the very concept of the print-based phone book – already rendered out-of-date and obsolete by the ever-steady ...

Robocall Study Ranks Wireless Carriers’ Performance Detecting, Managing Unwan...
Lee Ann Rush SEATTLE – A newly released study by Mind Commerce of leading wireless carriers’ robocall detection and unwanted call management solutions finds that Verizon’s “Enhanced Caller Name ID” solution has the highest overall accuracy, followed by T-Mobile and AT&T.   The Federal Trade Commission reported that consumers filed more than 4.5 million robocall complaints in 2017, up from 3.4 million the pr...