Yellow Pages Directory Inc

Find a Business Near: Kansas

Choose A City In Kansas

You can add a business for just $49.95 per year. To add a business please submit your business info here.




Below is a list of all cities within the State of Kansas in which we have business listings.
 

Population for Kansas: 2,851,183

Total Males: 1,414,881
Total Females: 1,436,302
Median Household Income: $51,273
Total Households: 1,109,391

A List of Cities is Below

Choose a city to display a list of business industries in that city or locality. All data copyright © Yellow Pages Directory Inc.





Number of Firms, Establishments, Employment, and Payroll by Employee Size for Kansas (2015)

STATE EMPLOYMENT SIZE FIRMS ESTABLISHMENTS EMPLOYMENT ANNUAL PAYROLL (1,000)
Kansas 01: Total 58,391 74,526 1,189,876 $51,259,676
Kansas 02: 0-4 32,835 32,896 55,269 $1,984,725
Kansas 03: 5-9 9,898 10,003 64,859 $2,061,888
Kansas 04: 10-19 6,197 6,531 82,344 $2,905,927
Kansas 05: <20 48,930 49,430 202,472 $6,952,540
Kansas 06: 20-99 5,625 7,660 207,752 $7,834,555
Kansas 07: 100-499 1,653 4,557 196,742 $8,220,930
Kansas 08: <500 56,208 61,647 606,966 $23,008,025
Kansas 09: 500+ 2,183 12,879 582,910 $28,251,651

Green Initiatives & Environmental History for: Kansas





Basic History

Spanish explorers are considered the first Europeans to have traveled this region. Ceded to Spain by France in 1763, the territory reverted to France in 1800 and was sold to the U.S. in 1803. The first permanent white settlements in Kansas were outposts established to protect travelers along the Santa Fe and Oregon trails. Just before the Civil War, the conflict between the pro- and anti-slavery forces earned the region the grim title of ‘Bleeding Kansas’. Kansas became a state in 1861.

Environmental History

Native grasses cover one-third of Kansas. Bluestem, buffalo grass, and hairy gramas are types of grass that grow in most parts of the state. Native conifer, eastern red cedar is generally found throughout the state. Hackberry, black walnut, sycamore and cottonwood predominate western Kansas. Kansas’s indigenous mammals include the common cottontail, black-tailed jackrabbit, black-tailed dog, muskrat and raccoon. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service named 123 Kansas animal species as threatened or endangered. Among these are the Indiana and the gray bats, bald eagle, whooping crane and black-footed ferret.

Green Initiatives

The city of Kansas has been progressive and innovative in its efforts to implement green initiatives, which represent part of a more expansive agenda to make Kansas City a truly sustainable city. The view of sustainability incorporates green programs into a broader triple bottom line approach that simultaneously promotes social equity, economic vitality and environmental quality. The city is revising the development code and area plans to address transportation efficiency; adopting upgraded energy codes that are expected to enhance energy efficiency standards by 30%; performing energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy additions to several municipal buildings, which includes energy efficiency upgrades and renewable energy installations like upgrading lighting systems, installing variable frequency drives for motors, installing solar hot water systems; conducting sustainability education training; converting all traffic signals from incandescent bulbs to LED bulbs, which use much less power and have a longer economic life; designing and constructing traffic signal synchronization center that will reduce driver time delays, fossil fuel usage and greenhouse gas emissions through citywide traffic signal coordination; strengthening and leveraging each community’s commitments to a sustainable energy future; as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s new Better Buildings program, EnergyWorks KC is an initiative consisting of several projects to reduce both energy use in buildings and the output of greenhouse emissions.

Recent News:








Firm Settles Violations with EPA; Provides Equipment to Maricopa County Clini...
Lee Ann Rush   SAN FRANCISCO – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a settlement with True View Windows & Glass Block, Inc. for violations of the federal Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule. The agreement requires True View, which operates in Arizona and Colorado, to pay a $15,060 penalty and spend $14,940 on blood lead analyzers and test kits for six Maricopa County, Arizona. health clinics.   “Exposure to lead-based paint is one of the most common ways children develop l...

EPA Marks Cleanup Milestone at Former Synergy Site in Claremont, N.H.
Lee Ann Rush   BOSTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that the former Synergy manufactured gas facility in Claremont, N.H., is now suitable for reuse and redevelopment after a successful hazardous waste cleanup at the site. EPA and the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services oversaw the cleanup, which began in 2015 and concluded in July 2018. On October 11, AmeriGas will transfer ownership of the property to the City of Claremont.   “Today’s milestone is a testament to how ...

U.S. EPA, California Settle with UC Regents Over Davis Superfund Site Cleanup
Lee Ann Rush   SAN FRANCISCO –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) have reached a settlement with the Regents of the University of California (University) to begin an estimated $14 million cleanup of contaminated soil, solid waste, and soil gas at the Laboratory for Energy-related Health Research/Old Campus Landfill Superfund site in Davis, Calif. Contaminants found at the site include carbon-14, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticid...

EPA and Camden, New Jersey Tackle Illegal Dumping
Lee Ann Rush   NEW YORK, NY – On 10/04/2018, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that Center for Family Services, Inc. in Camden, New Jersey was selected to receive $120,000 in funding through the 2018 Environmental Justice Collaborative Problem-Solving (EJCPS) Cooperative Agreement Program. Ten organizations nationwide were selected to receive a total of $1.2 million in funding. Center for Family Services, Inc. is a non-profit organization working to address public health threats and...